Discussion:
kabbalah update
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Corey White
2016-07-07 17:26:57 UTC
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The system of Kabbalah I created maps numbers to words. I'm trying to prove that numbers are basically just variables, and any problem can have more than one answer. I'm sure its true, but the education system doesn't want people to know this.

My problem was assigning numbers to the words we normally use instead of the numeric symbols 1 through 10. To do this each letter is given one unique number. The numerical values for all the letters in a word are added together. So o+n+e=1, and t+w+o=2. That's all there is too it! For consistency and completeness all of the letters have one unique number.

This didn't require the entire alphabet. In fact only 16 letters are needed to make any number. Here is a chart with the solution:.

E = -2
F = -6
G = 0
H = -7
I = 7
L = 9
N = 2
O = 1
R = 4
S = 3
T = 10
U = 5
V = 6
W = -9
X = -4
Z = -3


Here are the first 11 numbers spelled out with this:

(zero) = (-3 + -2 + 4 + 1)

(one) = (1 + 2 + -2)

(two) = (10 + -9 + 1)

(three) = (10 + -7 + 4 + -2 + -2)

(four) = (-6 + 1 + 5 + 4)

(five) = (-6 + 7 + 6 + -2)

(six) = (3 + 7 + -4)

(seven) = (3 + -2 + 6 + -2 + 2)

(eight) = (-2 + 7 + 0 + -7 + 10)

(nine) = (2 + 7 + 1 + -2)

(ten) = (10 + -2 + 2)

To contemplate larger numbers you use exponents.

ten^two = (10 + -2 + 2)^(10 + -9 +2)

ten^two = (10)^(2)

ten^two = 100

Here is a more complicated answer:

(ten^(two))*three = (10 + -2 + 2)^(10 + -9 + 1) * (10 + -7 + 4 + -2 + -2)

(ten^(two))*three = ( 10^2 ) * 3

(ten^(two))*three = ( 100 ) * 3

(ten^(two))*three = 300
Corey White
2016-07-11 21:40:52 UTC
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Post by Corey White
The system of Kabbalah I created maps numbers to words. I'm trying to prove that numbers are basically just variables, and any problem can have more than one answer. I'm sure its true, but the education system doesn't want people to know this.
My problem was assigning numbers to the words we normally use instead of the numeric symbols 1 through 10. To do this each letter is given one unique number. The numerical values for all the letters in a word are added together. So o+n+e=1, and t+w+o=2. That's all there is too it! For consistency and completeness all of the letters have one unique number.
This didn't require the entire alphabet. In fact only 16 letters are needed to make any number. Here is a chart with the solution:.
E = -2
F = -6
G = 0
H = -7
I = 7
L = 9
N = 2
O = 1
R = 4
S = 3
T = 10
U = 5
V = 6
W = -9
X = -4
Z = -3
(zero) = (-3 + -2 + 4 + 1)
(one) = (1 + 2 + -2)
(two) = (10 + -9 + 1)
(three) = (10 + -7 + 4 + -2 + -2)
(four) = (-6 + 1 + 5 + 4)
(five) = (-6 + 7 + 6 + -2)
(six) = (3 + 7 + -4)
(seven) = (3 + -2 + 6 + -2 + 2)
(eight) = (-2 + 7 + 0 + -7 + 10)
(nine) = (2 + 7 + 1 + -2)
(ten) = (10 + -2 + 2)
To contemplate larger numbers you use exponents.
ten^two = (10 + -2 + 2)^(10 + -9 +2)
ten^two = (10)^(2)
ten^two = 100
(ten^(two))*three = (10 + -2 + 2)^(10 + -9 + 1) * (10 + -7 + 4 + -2 + -2)
(ten^(two))*three = ( 10^2 ) * 3
(ten^(two))*three = ( 100 ) * 3
(ten^(two))*three = 300
I've come up with another useful tool for this problem. It is the addition of a new mathematical symbol. The symbol is the colon. :

The colon multiplies the word it is next two by ten. So, one:two would be read as one*ten + two
The

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